All about the First Grade Sight Words

First Grade Dolch and Fry Sight Words List

“The”, “a”, “is”, “are” – Can you guess what’s common with these words? 

That they are very common.

Yes, they are some of the most frequently used words in the English language. And, that’s why they fall in the category of the “sight words”. 

Sight words are those words in English that appear quite frequently in texts and speech. It is crucial for kids to get a good grasp of these words in order to gain language proficiency sooner. 

We have discussed the topic what are sight words at length in the linked article where you will also find the properties and need of knowing sight words. 

Here, we will be particularly discussing First Grade Sight Words. 

We will see the sight words list that a first grader is expected to learn and remember according to both – Dolch and Fry. Then, we will see how simple sentences can be framed using first grade sight words. We will go on to explore a few sight word games and activities for First Grade kids that you can enjoy at your home. 

First Grade Dolch Sight Words List

Here’s a little history linked to the Dolch Sight Words. 

Edward William Dolch brought the concept of sight words based on the most frequently used words in children’s books in those days and published the list of such words in a journal article in 1936. He published his book by the name Problems in Reading in 1948. 

Dolch provided a list of sight words for each stage – Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade and Third Grade Sight Words list. 

According to Dolch, along with the kindergarten sight words, first graders are also expected to get a sound grip on the next set of sight words known as the first grade sight words. 

The table below shows First Grade Dolch Sight Words List:

afteragainwalk
justknowwere
thenthinkwhen
livemayof
somestoptake
ananyas
every flyfrom
hasherhim
oldonceopen
thankthemask
givebycould
hisgoinghad
overhowlet
putround

First Grade Fry Sight Words List – The First 100 Fry Sight Words

In the 1950s, Edmund Fry came up with a list of most common words used in the texts of Grades 3 – 9 books and then updated that list in the year 198o. 

Fry Sight Words list is a more contemporary list of words as compared to the Dolch Sight Words. It includes the most frequent 1000 words in the English language. 

These 1000 Fry sight words can privy kids to almost 90% of the words that they would come across in their books, articles, websites and newspapers. 

aaboutall
beenbutby
downeachfind
haveheher
isitits
moremyno
otheroutpart
thatthetheir
totwoup
whenwhichwho
amanand
calledcancome
firstforfrom
himhishow
likelonglook
notnownumber
peoplesaidsee
themthenthere
usewaswater
willwithwords
areasat
coulddaydid
getgohad
Iifin
mademakemany
ofonone
shesosome
thesetheythis
waywewere
wouldwriteyou
beintothan
domaytime
hasorwhat
your

First Grade Sentences with Sight Words

Here are a few sentences framed using sight words up to first grade. 

  1. I want to play again.
  2. I walk to school every day.
  3. My name is Shane and I am 9 years old.
  4. She does not come to play as she has her exams this week.
  5. When people give us anything, we should thank them.
  6. I did not know that Superman could fly so high.
  7. I asked my mother if I could go to the fair.

Sight Word Games and Activities for First Grade Kids

No child would want to learn something sitting for hours and memorizing. 

However, the same child would also never say a no to playing fun games. 

Why not utilize this fact to help our kids learn the sight words much more easily with exciting activities and games? Listed below are a few ideas for such activities:

  1. One Sight of the Chocolate
  2. Kids would love to play any game that involves chocolates, won’t they?

    Here, they would get more familiar with the sight words using the chocolates.

    Write sight words on different papers and arrange them properly on a table.

    Then you have to speak any one of the sight words and kids have to place the chocolate on the top of that sight word card.  

    The one who is able to place the chocolates correctly and in the least time wins the game. 

  3. Flip and Win
  4. Place the sight words flashcards on a plane surface. Flip them such that the face where the sight word is written is hidden. 

    Remember that you have to make identical pairs of sight words. For example, 

    two flashcards with “from” written on them, two other flashcards with “again” written on them, so on and so forth. 

    Initially, place 8-10 such flashcards and increase the number depending upon the difficulty level you want the game to have. 

    The player will flip any one of the cards and try to find out its identical flashcard.

    That is, if the player flipped and found “again” on the card, he/she will search for the other card with the same sight word written on it. 

    The player will keep flipping until he/she finds the match. 

    The more number of tries one needs to take in finding the match, the lesser one scores.